Space age and old generation problematic

While technology and other tools are developing on the world for years, we will meet with the old generation who insists on changing the technology in the old days and the space age. This problematic situation is about not renewing itself or renewing itself. Older technology and old brains do not get tired of defending an old technology all the time.

Day after day, old techs have to leave their place with new generation technologies. For most of us, this transition does not become compulsive. A new generation of fast-paced generation is trying to catch up and do better, while the old generation insists on not changing. The elderly are making every effort to add more to the ancestor rather than leaving it to the edge. This sometimes leads to new things to do. Most of the time, he is struggling to prevent any new construction, such as a security wall, ahead of the old one. To solve this problem, the new ones often leave the old ones and create a new order. Continue reading “Space age and old generation problematic”

The “Boring Software” manifesto

As software developers we are tired of the false claims made by evangelists of the latest and greatest technology. We will no longer confront them with their lack of understanding of computer science fundamentals, nor will we defend our lack of knowledge of their hyped and volatile technologies. The state of industry is forcing us to value:

  • Not only working software,
    • but also well-crafted software,
    • built exclusively with popular and proven tools.
  • Not only responding to change,
    • but also steadily adding value,
    • while reducing the dependencies and complexity.
  • Not only individuals and interactions,
    • but also a community of professionals,
    • that share best practices with verifiable claims.
  • Not only customer collaboration,
    • but also productive partnerships,
    • to reduce the scope of the software we build.

That is, in pursuit of “agility and craftsmanship” we have found “boring software” to be indispensable. Continue reading “The “Boring Software” manifesto”

Goodbye DMCA and Github

Microsoft and Apple collaborators are still making premiums through the warehouse. For this reason they have turned off warehouses that do not comply with some DMCA policies. Guys, even when we try to delete the stores, it’s failing. We can not do anything.

It is clear from DMCA that this is a ridiculous policy. It was frustrating for us to let such things happen in Github. That’s why I carry all my stores.

Fucking goodbye to the DC and other policies. 🙂

O Language: Web Site Update

The website of that language has been renewed. We converted the site to a documentation site in order to use it more efficiently. So we will create the documentation directly by hovering over the site. You can search by direct documentation.

For example, if you use the term “file” directly on the site, you can make automatic assignments like “Files”. We made searches and corrections in the post. We have adapted our documentation to the most recent version.

 

These types of optimizations will be effective both in terms of google and site. While doing such optimizations, we have updated the site design. You can visit olang.space to see the updates.

 

O Language: Exception Management

Exception management is an array that allows you to check whether an error has occurred depending on an object. The content is checked to see if there is an error, or to the end if no error has occurred.

Begin is used to control an object.

begin object{
   ......
}

“Expect” and “recover” are used to debug and print out errors. Automatic “error” identification is done. In this way, we can use this definition as an internal variable.

begin object{
   if (test == "hello"){
     except test "Hello is not usefull. Please use Hi on project."
   }

   recover test{
      println(error)
   }
}

If no errors are received, “final” is used. If there is no error in this way, the values in “final” are automatically executed.

def test = "hello"
begin object{
   if (test == "hello"){
     except test "Hello is not usefull. Please use Hi on project."
   }

   recover object{
     println(error)
   }

   final object{
      println("Hello is not used. Yay!")
   }
}

This is how we debug it. Exception detection can be used in this way.

Web site: http://olang.space/

Source: http://olang.space/begin